interference [dac] is an audiovisual installation that explores the combination and interaction of waveforms in one medium with those of another. In the installation, sound waves affect light waves while analogue elements alter digital ones. The work consists of a linear array of four miniature projectors, each affixed to a loudspeaker cone. The projectors are configured to output a series of abstract lines and patterns that are inspired by Young’s interference experiment – an experiment by the scientist Thomas Young which led to the wave theory of light. The projected patterns are blurred and disrupted as the projectors are rattled and trembled by the movement of the loudspeaker cones. This motion results in visual distortions that occur at audio rates, which are significantly faster than any available digital refresh-rate. Therefore, those experiencing interference [dac] perceive the images being processed in a manner impossible to achieve with digital techniques alone, and are immersed in a sensory-blurring audiovisual experience. In this way, interference [dac] explores the concept of wave interference, not only as a physical phenomenon, but also through the intermingling of different mediums as well as disparate modes of communication.

The work consists of four miniature projectors, each mounted on a loudspeaker cone. The loudspeakers are in turn mounted on four plinths, allowing the projectors to cast their light onto the container wall in front of them. The audio component of the piece, which consists of simple waveforms and digital clicks, is emitted from the loudspeakers (as well as two auxiliary subwoofers). The loudspeaker cone’s movements cause the projector to shake synchronously with the audio, causing the projector’s image to be blurred at times of intense sonic activity. The projectors and the speakers are connected to a computer. After startup and synchronisation, custom-written audiovisual software generates the video and aural components of the piece.

interference [dac] .prototype

amplified audio. loudspeaker-mounted mini projector | 2016