As a kid, I had a fascination with egg drop soup, or rather, with the filamentous, beaten yolks that would float around in it, gazing over their undulating threads until I’d found my soup had gone cold. There was something infinitely watchable in their stochastic suspension, something I similarly find myself drawn to in Berlin-based artist Robert Seidel‘s newest work, vitreous. The experimental film features nine virtual sculptures created out of various computer-generated 3D “clusters of fibrous refractions, as well as the gravitational lensing of different volumetric and chromatic densities.” The result is an abstract chaos of colors wherein the only constant is that form finds itself in emptiness, and vice versa.

“The multilayered, continuously expanding and decaying system is driven by semi-chaotic processes with localized impulses and their speculative chain reactions,” writes vitreous‘ description. “In the spectrum of these possible movements, each singular sculpture becomes an integral component of the whole pictorial force-field. In its asymmetrical orchestration and multitude of spatial-temporal interactions, the abstract-organic images are close in appearance to the concepts of ‘moving paintings’ and ‘living sculptures’ Seidel develops for more than a decade now.”

Originally conceived in Minneapolis’ Target City Lights in 2012 as an 80m × 24m × 14m media facade artwork, vitreous appeared in 2015 as a large-scale projection, before its film incarnation appeared online, bearing a soundtrack by Nikolai von Sallwitz, only four days ago. Below, check out vitreous in action, and visit Robert Seidel’s website to learn more.

vitreous | robert seidel | experimental film 2015 from Robert Seidel on Vimeo.

Click here to visit Robert Seidel’s website.

Via The creators project

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